Why is Fiber So Important?  

Dietary fiber, also referred to as bulk or roughage, contains those parts of plants that are not absorbed by the body. Unlike protein, fat, or carbohydrates, fiber is not digested by the body but instead passes intact through the stomach and intestines. Studies suggest that by increasing one’s intake of dietary fiber, one can live a longer, healthier life. The belief that an increased intake of dietary fiber helps fight off diabetes, obesity, and certain cardiovascular diseases was postulated around 40 years ago and is supported by a steadily growing body of science today.

Fiber’s Role In The Prevention Of Disease

An editorial in the journal of the American Association for Cancer Research suggests that women with breast cancer are living longer with today’s treatment options. The journal noted that a common risk factor is the inadequate consumption of fiber. While fiber intake is known to lower blood sugar levels and cholesterol, the exact mechanisms by which fiber-rich foods work to make the body function better are unknown. However, those that include enough fats in their diets also tend to eat more vegetables and fewer calories than those on low-fiber diets. The number of benefits from fiber increases with the consumption of a variety of high-fiber foods.

Is Soy Good For The Gut?

While soy can provide both protein and fiber, its use is not without controversy. For instance, soy contains high levels of phytic acid, which are said to reduce the assimilation of magnesium, iron, calcium, and zinc in the body. Therefore, some people prefer soy-free protein powders or other types of fibers that can help aid with their bowels.

Types of Fiber

When soluble fiber dissolves in water, it forms a type of gel-like material. This substance helps lower both blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels. It is found in peas, oats, apples, beans, citrus fruits, psyllium, and carrots.

Insoluble fiber aids in moving material through the digestive system and also works to increase stool bulk. Good sources of insoluble fiber include most vegetables, white flour, bran, nuts, and legumes.

There are also a number of protein powders on the market that are both fiber-rich and full of other valuable nutrients. Most contain vegan protein that is derived from oats, soybeans or other plant-based foods. These protein supplements can completely replace meat in the diet or add to one’s daily intake of meat protein.

LENTEIN as a Fiber Supplement

LENTEIN™ is a carbon neutral, premium quality food source of fiber and protein that is derived from sustainable water lentils. Not only does it have the potential to promote a healthier body. It possesses nourishment-dense concentrations of vitamins, minerals, micronutrients, as well as health-promoting antioxidants. It also contains high-quality insoluble fiber, along with bioactive compounds, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids, which promote optimal cardiovascular, eye and brain functionality. It is gluten-free, soy-free and does not contain lactose.

Not only does the fiber in LENTEIN promote weight loss, but it also provides protection against diabetes, increases intestinal health and aids in the reduction of blood cholesterol levels. Heart-healthy LENTEIN contains high quality, health-promoting insoluble fiber, along with bioactive compounds, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids, which promote optimal cardiovascular, eye and brain functionality. It is gluten-free, soy-free and does not contain lactose. It is hypoallergenic and does not contain eggs or dairy. LENTEIN contains approximately 45% crude protein and is not derived from GMO plant species.

Of all the sources of dietary fiber available on today’s market, LENTEIN makes the greatest impact while leaving the smallest carbon footprint.

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